Thursday, 24 November 2016

Night ocean and the Moon


Remember a couple of weeks ago there was a 'super moon'? It's taken me a while to blog about it, I've been busy partying :)) Anyway one of my photographic missions in life is to get a decent moon-in-the-landscape shot. Preferably without resorting to stacking several shots. It must be possible, don't you think?
The 14th, when the moon was actually full here was much much too windy and cloudy to see anything. The 15th was a much clearer day and before sunset I headed down the coast to a new favourite beach side spot that has some photogenic sea rocks and a beachside pool. Nice ingredients for a shot. I thought I would be the only person with a tripod and camera there. Not so. Lots of people turned out to just look and many had cameras. Some had tripods. There was almost a party atmosphere. One guy had lens that was impressively big.
See him up on the hill?


He didn't stay there though and when the moon started to rise over the horizon he went down to the shadow of the hill, because the surf club up on the hill has these horrid orange tungsten lights that turn on at dusk.


To amuse myself while waiting I took these water ripple reflections of the rail at the edge of the sea pool. Then I went to the dark bit under the hill too.



I was wondering if the moon would photograph more detailed when closer to the horizon as part of a scene? Actually, no.
Here's my best picture of said 'super' moon and the ocean. I tried a variety of different settings, ISO's, shutter speeds, types of focus. All the things I'd read up on. Manual focus resulted in more detail in the moon but not of the landscape. (Below) That other light is the lights of a coal tanker that was sitting on the horizon.



So, the lesson learnt is that I have to get myself in a position where I have the moon against something else in the distance to have in focus as well, say some buildings or a bridge etc. Nevertheless I had a good time chatting with a few other photographers and being outsmarted once again by the beautiful moon.

Happy reflecting,
Val.






20 comments:

  1. That last one had a very fine atmosphere. My experience is that if you want to have a good shot of the moon, get it while it is high in the sky because there is less of the dirty atmosphere. And use as long a lens as you can get - and a tripod. Someone said that the best combination of settings is ISO 100, 1/100 sec and f 10. And manual focus on a tripod. If if you want something else and a structure on the moon sharplu visible at the same time, I'm afraid that "trickery" is the option.

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    1. Thanks Rune. Yes that's the recipe for the moon by itself, and I am sure the guy with the powerful telephoto lens did just that. I wanted to convey a sense of the seascape and the moon. So stacking is the only way? I am starting to think that all landscape photography is trickery ;)

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    2. There is another way - shoot it before it gets too dark (right before or after sunset). Then the contrast will not be to great

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  2. Ach! I'd have to stay up beyond my bedtime to get shots like this. :-)

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    1. Thanks Revrunner. The moon rises at vastly different times, even from one night to the next. A great app is called The Photographer's Ephemeris. You key in your date and location and all the information about sunrise/sunset/moonrise is there. It's free and runs on donations.

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  3. Very nice moon shots. i had the same trouble trying to provide some perspective by including a subject in the foreground. Missed the rising because of clouds, then tried to catch it setting the next morning and there were more clouds. So, my moon is a day older but still "super."

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    1. I've come to the conclusion that a clear night is better than a 'super' moon!

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  4. I really love the water ripple reflections, so pretty. The next photo with the moonshine on the water is brilliant, and looks just like Monet's 'Impression, Sunrise'. Wow! I got lucky on super moon night by stepping out with my camera just as a phane flew past the big moon.

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    1. Excellent! I've seen the same thing done with bats, birds, lovers...I guess it's just a case of right place, right time, camera ready!

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  5. Went to the dark side, you say. :-)

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    1. But he wasn't wearing his Darth Vader costume har har..

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  6. Nice Shots and reflections. I like them.

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  7. lovely reflection with the rippled water

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  8. The moon reflection in the water is good. I'm hopeless with moon shots and I was told it is because I like to have something else in the shot too. The camera can't focus on both and even with manual it will make the moon look white, which mine did because I had a tree and leaves dangling in front. For contours on the moon you need a long lens and only the moon.

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    1. I've done telephoto lens shots of just the moon, but you know NASA does it better than any of us ;)

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  9. Really lovely blue night. Love these photos, the moon reflection is so beautiful.
    Hugs

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  10. The size of some lenses are astounding, I don't think I could even focus without a tripod ☺ I have to say I failed with the super moon Val, not an easy shot! Beautiful reflection shots here. I can't wait to see all the new development going on in Sydney.. like it wasn't big enough 😀

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    1. Hi Grace I remember reading your post about the superman, it encouraged me to share this :)

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  11. Lovely shots Valerie. To get everything in focus you need to use a tripod and understand hyperfocal distance. Here is a link to explain how:
    http://www.techradar.com/how-to/photography-video-capture/cameras/how-to-calculate-hyperfocal-distance-free-photography-cheat-sheet-1321007

    merry Xmas

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